Ardeshir Edward Nadimi, MD, FAAD, FACMS


Board-Certified Dermatologist
Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon
Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology
Ardeshir Nadimi is a Dermatologist in Centreville, Virginia at U.S. Dermatology Partners. His services include annual skin exams, skin cancer, and more.
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Accepting New Patients

Ardeshir Nadimi, MD | U.S. Dermatology Partners Centreville

 

Dr. Ardeshir Edward Nadimi is a board-certified dermatologist and fellowship-trained Mohs surgeon. He specializes in the treatment of skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, and other rare forms of skin cancer.

He completed an American College of Mohs Surgery approved fellowship in Mohs surgery/dermatologic oncology at the nationally-recognized Scripps Clinic under Dr. Hugh Greenway — who trained with the inventor of Mohs surgery, Dr. Frederic Mohs. During his fellowship, Dr. Nadimi also focused on venous/lymphatic medicine, including the treatment of leg veins as well as cosmetic/laser dermatology.

Prior to his fellowship, Dr. Nadimi earned his medical doctorate from Eastern Virginia Medical School, where he was inducted by his peers into the prestigious Gold Humanism Honor Society. He then completed a one-year internship in Internal Medicine at Georgetown University Hospital, followed by a three-year Dermatology residency at Washington Hospital Center-Georgetown University Hospital.

Dr. Nadimi has published several peer-reviewed manuscripts in the dermatology literature related to skin cancer, is the author of a textbook chapter on advanced skin cancer reconstruction and has presented original research at national conferences.

Dr. Nadimi’s treatment philosophy revolves around listening very closely to his patients to come up with a mutually agreed-upon plan. He also believes in the healing power of the physician-patient relationship.  Dr. Nadimi is fluent in Spanish and Persian (Farsi).

He is excited to return to his hometown and provide patient-centered care to the DMV (D.C., Maryland, Virginia) community. He is proud to have attended Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia — often ranked the number one high school in the United States. He enjoys spending time with his family, playing tennis, hiking, listening to all genres of music, and rooting for the Washington Football Team.

Specialties and Affiliations
  • American Board of Dermatology
  • American Academy of Dermatology
  • American College of Mohs Surgery
  • American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

Clinic Locations

Services Offered By Ardeshir Nadimi, MD

What Is Actinic Keratosis?

Actinic Keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty lesion on the skin that develops slowly and indicates the presence of sun damage. It is most commonly found on parts of the body frequently exposed to the sun including the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands or forearms, neck, and shoulders.

Actinic Keratosis two days after a freezing removal treatment

Actinic keratosis improves just two days after a freezing removal treatment.

Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous and can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. In fact, some 40 to 60 percent of squamous cell skin cancers begin as untreated actinic keratoses.

Because of this, your doctor should be diligent in diagnosing, treating and monitoring actinic keratosis.

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Basal Cell Carcinoma, also known as basalioma or basal cell cancer, is the most common type of skin cancer and carries the least amount of risk, though it still requires attention. If caught and treated early, basal cell carcinomas are not likely to be life-threatening, but they do have the potential to cause disfigurement of the skin tissue.

Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S., and up to 30% of Caucasians may develop basal cell carcinomas in their lifetime.

Basal cell carcinoma treatment

Basal cell carcinoma can be treated by removing the affected area.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening. Though it is unlikely to spread to other parts of your body, if left untreated, basal cell carcinoma can move into nearby bone or other tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma typically begins as a small, shiny bump on the face, although it can occur on any part of the body.

What Is Cryotherapy?

Cryotherapy, or “cryosurgery,” is a simple, non-invasive procedure in which liquid nitrogen is used to freeze and destroy growths on the surface of the skin. This is an effective treatment for precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses), as well as other skin conditions such as warts, skin tags and moles.

Applying liquid nitrogen to skin lesions allows dermatologists to target the damaged skin cells and destroy them at the cellular level. After freezing, the affected area may blister and scab over, and should heal within three to six weeks.

Our dermatology team uses cryosurgery to treat a wide range of conditions. It offers a number of advantages: Cryotherapy is a simple, affordable outpatient procedure, the discomfort level is minimal, and there is a low risk of infection.

In cryotherapy treatment, liquid nitrogen is applied to the skin to freeze and destroy the affected tissue.

In cryotherapy treatment, liquid nitrogen is applied to the skin to freeze and destroy the affected tissue.

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What Is Mohs Surgery?

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

Mohs surgery is a highly specialized surgical technique used to treat non-melanoma skin cancers in which the surgeon removes all of the visible cancer, plus a small margin of the surrounding healthy tissue and examines it to ensure that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery.

Before and After Mohs Surgery Technique

The Mohs surgery technique treats skin cancers by removing all of the visible cancer. Image Source: newhealthadvisor.com

During Mohs micrographic surgery — named after Dr. Frederic Mohs, who first performed it in the 1930s — cancer is removed from the skin layer by layer until all cancerous cells have been removed. This type of surgery is most commonly used for cancers that have a high risk of re-occurrence. This technique allows for complete removal of the skin cancer while minimizing the removal of surrounding healthy skin.

What Is Sebaceous Carcinoma?

A rare and aggressive form of skin cancer, sebaceous carcinoma is sometimes referred to as sebaceous gland carcinoma, sebaceous gland adenocarcinoma or meibomian gland carcinoma.

Sebaceous carcinoma can develop in any sebaceous glands, which lubricate the skin, but it most often begins on or around the eyelids. If it is found and treated early, treatment is often successful. However, if sebaceous carcinoma spreads, it can be deadly.

Because sebaceous carcinoma can appear to be a benign growth such as a stye, diagnosis is often delayed, which increases the risk of death. If you notice a growth on your eyelid, it’s important to make an appointment with your dermatologist. The sooner sebaceous carcinoma is diagnosed and treated, the better the outcome.

32-year-old cosmetologist presented with 3-month history of treatment for presumed chalazion. A) The left upper eyelid showed 2 mm of ptosis with swelling. B) Focal loss of eye lashes was appreciated (arrow).” (source: “Early Onset of Sebaceous Carcinoma” by Dr. Debashis Ghosh, creative commons license)

What Is Seborrheic Keratosis?

Seborrheic keratosis is one of the most common noncancerous skin growths found in older adults. It most commonly appears as a brown, black or light tan growth on the face, chest, shoulders or back. Although they are not cancerous, they can look like skin cancer.

Seborrheic keratosis also known as seborrheic verruca or a senile wart.

Seborrheic keratosis is also known as seborrheic verruca or a senile wart.

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin. Although it is usually not life-threatening, it can be aggressive in some cases.

If left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Dermatologist examining male patient's skin for signs of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Your dermatologist will be able to examine your skin for signs of squamous cell carcinoma.

What Are Skin Cysts?

Cysts are pockets of tissue (sacs) that may become filled with pus, fluids, skin cells, and even air.

They are fairly common on the skin and can appear anywhere on the body. Cysts may feel like a pea under the surface of the skin, but without removal, they can grow significantly larger over time. In most cases, cysts are not painful, and they grow slowly. There are different types of cysts as we’ll discuss in the next section, and the vast majority of these skin growths are benign (not cancerous). Not all cysts will require treatment, but it is vitally important to have any lump under the skin evaluated and diagnosed by a board-certified dermatologist because some soft tissue malignancies (growths that are cancerous) can present like a cyst. Before recommending removal or other cyst treatments, your dermatologist will examine the growth to determine whether it is likely to cause you pain, become infected, or otherwise lead to skin health issues.

Dermatologist treating cyst on patient's back

Skin cysts, which can appear anywhere on the body, are usually painless and grow slowly.

What is Hyperhidrosis?

Hyperhidrosis, often referred to as excessive sweating, occurs when people experience disproportionate and/or unnecessary sweat production. While sweating is a natural function of the body’s systems to keep itself cool and maintain the best temperature, sweating too much or sweating that is not necessary to cool the body can create many difficulties that impact your overall health and wellbeing. Generalized hyperhidrosis may affect the whole body. Others have localized cases of excessive sweating that impact only certain areas. Specifically, there are three main types of localized hyperhidrosis: axillary (impacting the underarms), palmar (impacting the palms), and plantar (impacting the feet). If you experience general or localized excessive sweating at least once per week, you should talk to a dermatologist about a treatment plan.

There are three main types of localized hyperhidrosis: axillary (impacting the underarms), palmar (impacting the palms), and plantar (impacting the feet).

What Is Lipoma?

A lipoma is a common, non-cancerous, soft tissue growth just below the skin made up of fat cells. Though most lipomas are not a cause for concern, if the growth becomes too large, it may become painful.

What Is Melasma?

Melasma is a fairly common skin condition that creates the appearance of brown to gray-brown patches of skin, usually on the face. It can also occur on the neck and forearms and is the result of the body producing too much melanin, that natural substance that colors our hair, skin, and eyes.

If you’re dealing with dark spots or patches on your skin from the chronic condition melasma, the U.S. Dermatology Partners team can help you to improve the appearance of these spots and minimize the risk for future flare-ups of the condition. Read the page below to learn more or reach out to the U.S. Dermatology Partners location nearest you for more information.

Milia (Milium) Symptoms & Causes

Milia is a commonly occurring skin condition that causes small bumps on the skin, and while these bumps may be irritating, the skin condition is harmless. You can learn more about milia, how it’s treated, and when to visit your dermatologist for help managing this skin condition on this page. If you have questions or want to schedule an appointment at U.S. Dermatology Partners, we invite you to take a few moments to complete our simple online request form.

What Are Moles?

Atypical moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, are unusual-looking benign (noncancerous) moles.

A dysplastic mole is one that, when viewed on a cellular level, has features unlike those of a healthy, benign mole. A benign mole will have a regular pattern of coloration and pigment, even borders, symmetry, and a tan or pink color. Dysplastic moles can be asymmetric, have indistinct borders, or contain multiple colors or very dark pigment.

Dysplastic moles are often spotted as the “ugly duckling” on a patient’s skin. Any departure from the typical mole a person’s skin makes may be dysplastic. They can appear anywhere on the body, but in most cases are found on the back, chest, buttocks, breasts, or scalp.

Benign mole on skin

People with atypical moles are at a higher risk of developing melanoma.

What Is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a fairly common skin condition that causes redness in your face. In some cases, it may also produce small, red, pus-filled bumps. Typically these signs and symptoms may flare up for a period of weeks to months and then diminish for a while.

Rosacea may sometimes be mistaken for acne, an allergic reaction or other skin problems. It is believed to be caused by a combination of hereditary and environmental factors.

Learn more: 4 Types of Rosacea

Rosacea Treatment on facial skin.

Rosacea causes redness on the face.



What Is Sebaceous Hyperplasia?

Sebaceous hyperplasia is a benign bump on the skin that forms as a result of over-productive oil glands. When oil glands are damaged, they can become enlarged and clogged, leading to this condition. It is primarily a cosmetic concern rather than a medical problem.

Sebaceous hyperplasia is a benign bump on the skin that forms as a result of over-productive oil glands

Sebaceous hyperplasia is a benign bump on the skin that forms as a result of over-productive oil glands.

What Are Skin Tags?

Skin tags are small, soft skin growths that can occur anywhere on the body but are most common on the eyelids, neck, armpits, groin folds and under the breasts. They are harmless but they can be annoying, particularly if they are in an area where they are rubbed on by clothing. They may be flesh-colored, pink or may darken.

Dermatologist examines a skin tags of patient, close up.

Skin tags are small, soft growths that can be skin-colored, pink, or may darken.