Matthew Hoffmann, MD, FAAD


Board-Certified Dermatologist
Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon
Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology
Dr. Hoffmann is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon in Longview, TX. He specializes in skin cancer removal.

Dr. Hoffmann is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon in Longview, TX. He specializes in skin cancer removal.

 

Dr. Matthew Hoffmann is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon in Longview, TX.

Dr. Matthew Hoffman joined U.S. Dermatology Partners after completing a Mohs Surgery and Dermatologic Oncology Fellowship at Florida State University in Tallahassee. He earned his undergraduate degree in biology at Louisiana Tech University. He remained in Louisiana to attend Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport for his medical degree and internship. He moved to New Orleans to complete his dermatology residency at LSU. Throughout his training, Dr. Hoffmann authored and co-authored more than a dozen publications and presentations.

Dr. Matthew Hoffmann was drawn to dermatology after his father was diagnosed with and successfully treated for melanoma. He is passionate about building relationships with his patients and using advanced techniques to prevent and treat skin cancers. “Watching my dad go through the diagnosis and treatment of melanoma and getting to know the doctors who took care of him opened my eyes to the importance of dermatology and Mohs surgery,” says Dr. Matthew Hoffmann.

Dr. Matthew Hoffman specializes in the early identification and definitive treatment of skin cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinomas, as well as melanoma and other unusual cancers.

In his spare time, Dr. Hoffmann enjoys time with his family, traveling, playing golf, hunting, fishing, and practicing the French horn. He and his wife, Tara, are both from small towns, and they’re thrilled to raise their 3-year-old son in Longview.

Matthew Hoffmann treats patients at U.S. Dermatology Partners Longview, in Longview, Texas. He looks forward to meeting his patients, learning about their lives, and hearing their stories! Contact our office today to book an appointment.

Specialties and Affiliations
  • American Board of Dermatology
  • American Academy of Dermatology

Clinic Locations

Services Offered By Dr. Matthew Hoffmann

What Is Actinic Keratosis?

Actinic Keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty lesion on the skin that develops slowly and indicates the presence of sun damage. It is most commonly found on parts of the body frequently exposed to the sun including the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands or forearms, neck, and shoulders.

Actinic Keratosis two days after a freezing removal treatment

Actinic keratosis improves just two days after a freezing removal treatment.

Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous and can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. In fact, some 40 to 60 percent of squamous cell skin cancers begin as untreated actinic keratoses.

Because of this, your doctor should be diligent in diagnosing, treating and monitoring actinic keratosis.

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Basal Cell Carcinoma, also known as basalioma or basal cell cancer, is the most common type of skin cancer and carries the least amount of risk, though it still requires attention. If caught and treated early, basal cell carcinomas are not likely to be life-threatening, but they do have the potential to cause disfigurement of the skin tissue.

Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S., and up to 30% of Caucasians may develop basal cell carcinomas in their lifetime.

Basal cell carcinoma treatment

Basal cell carcinoma can be treated by removing the affected area.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening. Though it is unlikely to spread to other parts of your body, if left untreated, basal cell carcinoma can move into nearby bone or other tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma typically begins as a small, shiny bump on the face, although it can occur on any part of the body.

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What Is Mohs Surgery?

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

Mohs surgery is a highly specialized surgical technique used to treat non-melanoma skin cancers in which the surgeon removes all of the visible cancer, plus a small margin of the surrounding healthy tissue and examines it to ensure that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery.

Before and After Mohs Surgery Technique

The Mohs surgery technique treats skin cancers by removing all of the visible cancer. Image Source: newhealthadvisor.com

During Mohs micrographic surgery — named after Dr. Frederic Mohs, who first performed it in the 1930s — cancer is removed from the skin layer by layer until all cancerous cells have been removed. This type of surgery is most commonly used for cancers that have a high risk of re-occurrence. This technique allows for complete removal of the skin cancer while minimizing the removal of surrounding healthy skin.

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin. Although it is usually not life-threatening, it can be aggressive in some cases.

If left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Dermatologist examining male patient's skin for signs of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Your dermatologist will be able to examine your skin for signs of squamous cell carcinoma.

Effective Acne Solutions

If you’ve struggled with moderate to severe acne, including cystic or nodular acne, you know that many common acne treatments aren’t effective for everyone. Fortunately, the physicians at U.S. Dermatology Partners commonly prescribe Accutane (isotretinoin) for the treatment of those patients with acne that is unresponsive to other therapeutic options.

If you’ve struggled with moderate to severe acne, including cystic or nodular acne, you know that many common acne treatments aren’t effective for everyone. Fortunately, the physicians at U.S. Dermatology Partners commonly prescribe Accutane (isotretinoin) for the treatment of those patients with acne that is unresponsive to other therapeutic options.

What Is Acne?

Acne is a dermatological condition caused by inflammation and mild infection in clogged pores. If not properly treated, acne can cause emotional distress, low self-esteem, and depression. In severe cases, it can even lead to permanent scarring.

While not a serious physical health threat, acne is an embarrassing skin problem that can be life-altering for many patients. Though it is most common among teenagers, acne can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender, and can be mild, moderate or severe.

 

What Is an Annual Skin Examination?

Annual Skin Examinations are yearly scheduled skin exams with a dermatologist. Did you know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S.? In fact, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Sun damage to the skin is cumulative over a person’s lifetime, so the average risk of skin cancer also increases as our life expectancy gets longer.

Just as you schedule your annual physical or trip to the dentist, it is important to conduct a self-examination of your skin each month and schedule a professional annual skin examination once a year. Skin cancer is a treatable condition, but early detection is key.

 

Safe and Effective Skin Cancer Treatment

Photodynamic Therapy, often referred to simply as PDT, is a medical treatment that uses photosensitizing agents and light exposure to treat a range of conditions, including skin cancers, acne, and actinic keratosis (“pre-cancers”). You can learn more about photodynamic therapy on this page, and the U.S. Dermatology Partners team would love to hear from you if you’re interested in scheduling a consultation to discuss photodynamic therapy.  Simply use our online request form to schedule a consultation visit at the U.S. Dermatology Partners office closest to you.

Photodynamic Therapy PDT

Image Source: MedicineNet.com

What Is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory condition that causes patches of skin to become red, inflamed, and bumpy. This disease affects more than 8 million people in the U.S.

Psoriasis occurs when the immune system mistakes skin cells for a virus or other infection and responds by producing more skin cell growth. This can be triggered by stress, anxiety, injuries to the skin, infections and hormonal changes.

What Is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a fairly common skin condition that causes redness in your face. In some cases, it may also produce small, red, pus-filled bumps. Typically these signs and symptoms may flare up for a period of weeks to months and then diminish for a while.

Rosacea may sometimes be mistaken for acne, an allergic reaction or other skin problems. It is believed to be caused by a combination of hereditary and environmental factors.

Learn more: 4 Types of Rosacea

Rosacea Treatment on facial skin.

Rosacea causes redness on the face.



What Is Sun Damage?

The sun can age and burn your skin, and it can also cause damage on the cellular level, leading to skin cancer. The good news is, the U.S. Dermatology Partners team can help you formulate a plan to prevent sun damage and repair the effects of the sun’s UV rays so that you can go out and enjoy a sunny day. Learn more on this page or contact U.S. Dermatology Partners to schedule an appointment with us.

Sunscreen 101

Individuals who are prone to sunburn are thought to be genetically predisposed to skin cancer. Risk is also increased when exposure to UV rays is excessive. Sunscreen helps prevent the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation, including skin aging and skin cancer like melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

Sunscreens are rated and labeled with a sun protection factor (SPF) that measures the fraction of sunburn-producing UV rays that reach the skin. The higher the SPF, the greater the protection.

Sunscreen is a topical product that is used to reflect or absorb some of the ultraviolet rays from the sun.

Sunscreen is a topical product that is used to reflect or absorb some of the ultraviolet rays from the sun.

Insurance Plans Accepted By Dr. Matthew Hoffmann

What Our Patients Say

Matthew Hoffmann, MD
5 Stars  Had a surgery on my arm he was awesome he explained step by step instructions and made me feel comfortable about the procedure . thank you Dr Hoffmann and staff?? –
Source : Healthgrades – Mar 05, 2021
Matthew Hoffmann, MD
5 Stars  Went very well –
Source : Healthgrades – Feb 28, 2021
Matthew Hoffmann, MD
5 Stars  I have used Dr. Hoffman since he started here and I like him. Good doctor and surgeon ???? –
Source : Healthgrades – Feb 23, 2021