Mark Price, MD, FAAD


Board-Certified Dermatologist
Board-Certified Micrographic Dermatologic Surgeon
Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon
Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology
Dr. Mark Price is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon in Houston, Texas at U.S. Dermatology Partners Medical District.

Dr. Mark Price is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon in Houston, Texas at U.S. Dermatology Partners Medical District.

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Dr. Mark Price is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon seeing patients at U.S. Dermatology Partners Medical District in Houston, Texas.

Dr. Mark Price attended Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, where he was elected into Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society as a third-year medical student. After graduating with honors, he completed a transitional internship at St. Joseph Hospital and finished his dermatology residency at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Mark Price also completed a fellowship in Mohs micrographic surgery, cutaneous oncology, and laser surgery at Baptist Medical Center in Kansas City, Missouri.

Dr. Mark Price is currently an assistant clinical professor in dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine.

Badges & Awards

Specialties and Affiliations
  • American College of Mohs Surgery
  • American Academy of Dermatology
  • American Medical Association
  • American Board of Dermatology
  • American Society for Dermatologic Surgery
  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • Harris County Medical Society
  • Houston Dermatological Society
  • Texas Dermatological Society
  • Texas Medical Association
Badges and Awards

              

Clinic Locations

U.S. Dermatology Partners Medical District
U.S. Dermatology Partners Medical District

1213 Hermann Dr
#650
Houston, Texas 77004

(713) 528-8882

Services Offered By Mark Price, MD

What Is an Annual Skin Examination?

Annual Skin Examinations are yearly scheduled skin exams with a dermatologist. Did you know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S.? In fact, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Sun damage to the skin is cumulative over a person’s lifetime, so the average risk of skin cancer also increases as our life expectancy gets longer.

Just as you schedule your annual physical or trip to the dentist, it is important to conduct a self-examination of your skin each month and schedule a professional annual skin examination once a year. Skin cancer is a treatable condition, but early detection is key.

 

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Basal Cell Carcinoma, also known as basalioma or basal cell cancer, is the most common type of skin cancer and carries the least amount of risk, though it still requires attention. If caught and treated early, basal cell carcinomas are not likely to be life-threatening, but they do have the potential to cause disfigurement of the skin tissue.

Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S., and up to 30% of Caucasians may develop basal cell carcinomas in their lifetime.

Basal cell carcinoma treatment

Basal cell carcinoma can be treated by removing the affected area.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening. Though it is unlikely to spread to other parts of your body, if left untreated, basal cell carcinoma can move into nearby bone or other tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma typically begins as a small, shiny bump on the face, although it can occur on any part of the body.

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What is Merkel Cell Carcinoma?

Skin cancer is a common concern in the U.S.  Estimates reported by the American Academy of Dermatology suggest one in five people in the U.S. will develop some form of skin cancer. Merkel cell carcinoma is among the rarest forms of skin cancer, wherein estimates by the Skin Cancer Foundation suggest that only one in 130,000 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with Merkel cell carcinoma. Like melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer with a high mortality rate.  As with most potentially aggressive malignancies, early detection is the best way to decrease the risk of death associated with Merkel cell carcinoma. You can learn more about diagnosis and treatment options for Merkel cell carcinoma on this page.

Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare form of skin cancer that arises from Merkel cells, cells that reside deeper in the skin and function to send ‘touch’ signals from outside the skin to the inside of the body.  The diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma is ultimately made by an assessment under the microscope after a skin biopsy has been performed.  Skin biopsies are interpreted by dermatopathologists, doctors who specialize in evaluating skin under the microscope.  Dermatopathologists are well equipped to make this diagnosis accurately when skin tissue is submitted in a biopsy specimen.  Unfortunately, when Merkel cells become cancerous, they also become aggressive.  Merkel cell carcinoma can metastasize (spread) quickly, making it one of the most aggressive types of cancer.  While treatment for Merkel cell carcinoma may be successful, even with treatment Merkel cell carcinoma may evade what appears to be disease remission, and recur.

 

What Is Mohs Surgery?

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

Mohs surgery is a highly specialized surgical technique used to treat non-melanoma skin cancers in which the surgeon removes all of the visible cancer, plus a small margin of the surrounding healthy tissue and examines it to ensure that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery.

Before and After Mohs Surgery Technique

The Mohs surgery technique treats skin cancers by removing all of the visible cancer. Image Source: newhealthadvisor.com

During Mohs micrographic surgery — named after Dr. Frederic Mohs, who first performed it in the 1930s — cancer is removed from the skin layer by layer until all cancerous cells have been removed. This type of surgery is most commonly used for cancers that have a high risk of re-occurrence. This technique allows for complete removal of the skin cancer while minimizing the removal of surrounding healthy skin.

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin. Although it is usually not life-threatening, it can be aggressive in some cases.

If left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Dermatologist examining male patient's skin for signs of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Your dermatologist will be able to examine your skin for signs of squamous cell carcinoma.

Insurance Plans Accepted By Mark Price, MD

What Our Patients Say

Mark Price, MD
5 Stars  Dr. Price and his team are incredibly thorough and compassionate. Their follow through on every detail is so reassuring. I know I’m in the best of surgical hands. –
Source : Healthgrades – May 11, 2024
Mark Price, MD
5 Stars  Dr. Price and his staff take the time to explain everything that is going to happen. They are easy to talk to, very friendly and very knowledgeable. I definitely recommend him! –
Source : Healthgrades – May 09, 2024
Mark Price, MD
5 Stars  Excellent care from Dr. Price and staff. –
Source : Healthgrades – May 03, 2024

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