Mohs Surgeon in Houston

U.S. Dermatology Partners Medical District

Mohs Surgeon Houston, Texas | U.S. Dermatology Partners Houston Medical District
1213 Hermann Dr
#650
Houston, Texas 77004

We are located inside the Museum Medical Tower Building in Park Plaza Hospital complex. The building is located on the corner of Hermann Drive and Caroline. The parking garage is attached to our building, and the entrance is located on Caroline, which runs parallel to San Jacinto.

Get Directions

(713) 528-8882

Fax: (713) 528-8883

Monday:

7:30AM - 4:00PM

Tuesday:

7:30AM - 4:00PM

Wednesday:

7:30AM - 4:00PM

Thursday:

7:30AM - 4:00PM

Friday:

7:30AM - 12:00PM

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

About Our Mohs Surgeons in Houston

U.S. Dermatology Partners Medical District offers skin cancer treatment for patients in Houston, Texas. We are committed to providing an outstanding level of specialized Mohs Surgery services to those who live in and around the Houston, Texas area, including Rice University students.

Our Board-Certified, Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeons, Dr. Mark Price, and Dr. Leon Chen, are experts in the removal of skin cancer, as well as advanced reconstruction. Our revolutionary skin cancer procedures have produced substantial results for our patients with melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, or squamous cell carcinoma skin cancers.

We offer state of the art dermatologic surgery and skin care treatment to the Houston area and are fully committed to every patient that walks through our doors. Our Mohs surgeons, medical assistants, and staff work hard to ensure our patients receive the most effective treatment for their dermatologic issue or skin cancer in a caring and modern setting.

Our goal is to make our patients feel comfortable and at ease while receiving the newest and most sophisticated medical therapies available. We strive to be the leading center of skin cancer removal and Mohs surgery in Houston, Texas.

What Our Patients Say

Mark Price, MD
5 Stars  Always a great experience. Not your usual crazy busy office. They take their time with you, get in the quickly, and get treated quickly. De price explains everything extremely well. –
Source : Healthgrades – Jul 27, 2021
Houston – Medical District
5 Stars  This was simply the best medical visit/procedure I have ever encountered. I had a squamous "scrape and burn" removed from my head and a squamous "invasive" removed from my cheek. The scalp was quick and easy. The cheek cancer was also removed in a matter of minutes, sent to an onsite lab where Dr. Price was able to determine if his first cut removed all of the cancerous tissue or if additional surgery was needed. To no surprise to me, he got it all on the first effort. From my phone calls to the office, being greeted by the receptionist/front desk to everyone there, they were simply very professional and very personal. The two technicians I dealt with, (sorry, can't recall names) had great tenure. One lady had been there for eight years, the other for eleven. You don't have employees staying that long unless the operation has a great culture. It is obvious that Dr. Price, both professional and caring, created a culture that flows down to his people. One of the technicians told me that the man I just encountered ... kind, caring, personable, professional ... was that man 24/7. Wow. I recommend him without hesitation and couldn't imagine going to anyone else for dermatological surgical needs. He is the best. –
Source : Google – Jul 23, 2021
Mark Price, MD
5 Stars  Dr Price is very competent, congenial, and easy to talk to. He discusses your problem with you in detail and actually listens to you. Great doctor, great guy. –
Source : Healthgrades – Jul 23, 2021

Dermatology Services

What Is Actinic Keratosis?

Actinic Keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty lesion on the skin that develops slowly and indicates the presence of sun damage. It is most commonly found on parts of the body frequently exposed to the sun including the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands or forearms, neck, and shoulders.

Actinic Keratosis two days after a freezing removal treatment

Actinic keratosis improves just two days after a freezing removal treatment.

Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous and can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. In fact, some 40 to 60 percent of squamous cell skin cancers begin as untreated actinic keratoses.

Because of this, your doctor should be diligent in diagnosing, treating and monitoring actinic keratosis.

What Is an Annual Skin Examination?

Annual Skin Examinations are yearly scheduled skin exams with a dermatologist. Did you know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S.? In fact, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Sun damage to the skin is cumulative over a person’s lifetime, so the average risk of skin cancer also increases as our life expectancy gets longer.

Just as you schedule your annual physical or trip to the dentist, it is important to conduct a self-examination of your skin each month and schedule a professional annual skin examination once a year. Skin cancer is a treatable condition, but early detection is key.

 

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Basal Cell Carcinoma, also known as basalioma or basal cell cancer, is the most common type of skin cancer and carries the least amount of risk, though it still requires attention. If caught and treated early, basal cell carcinomas are not likely to be life-threatening, but they do have the potential to cause disfigurement of the skin tissue.

Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S., and up to 30% of Caucasians may develop basal cell carcinomas in their lifetime.

Basal cell carcinoma treatment

Basal cell carcinoma can be treated by removing the affected area.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening. Though it is unlikely to spread to other parts of your body, if left untreated, basal cell carcinoma can move into nearby bone or other tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma typically begins as a small, shiny bump on the face, although it can occur on any part of the body.

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What Is Mohs Surgery?

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

Mohs surgery is a highly specialized surgical technique used to treat non-melanoma skin cancers in which the surgeon removes all of the visible cancer, plus a small margin of the surrounding healthy tissue and examines it to ensure that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery.

Before and After Mohs Surgery Technique

The Mohs surgery technique treats skin cancers by removing all of the visible cancer. Image Source: newhealthadvisor.com

During Mohs micrographic surgery — named after Dr. Frederic Mohs, who first performed it in the 1930s — cancer is removed from the skin layer by layer until all cancerous cells have been removed. This type of surgery is most commonly used for cancers that have a high risk of re-occurrence. This technique allows for complete removal of the skin cancer while minimizing the removal of surrounding healthy skin.

What Is Sebaceous Carcinoma?

A rare and aggressive form of skin cancer, sebaceous carcinoma is sometimes referred to as sebaceous gland carcinoma, sebaceous gland adenocarcinoma or meibomian gland carcinoma.

Sebaceous carcinoma can develop in any sebaceous glands, which lubricate the skin, but it most often begins on or around the eyelids. If it is found and treated early, treatment is often successful. However, if sebaceous carcinoma spreads, it can be deadly.

Because sebaceous carcinoma can appear to be a benign growth such as a stye, diagnosis is often delayed, which increases the risk of death. If you notice a growth on your eyelid, it’s important to make an appointment with your dermatologist. The sooner sebaceous carcinoma is diagnosed and treated, the better the outcome.

32-year-old cosmetologist presented with 3-month history of treatment for presumed chalazion. A) The left upper eyelid showed 2 mm of ptosis with swelling. B) Focal loss of eye lashes was appreciated (arrow).” (source: “Early Onset of Sebaceous Carcinoma” by Dr. Debashis Ghosh, creative commons license)

What Is Seborrheic Keratosis?

Seborrheic keratosis is one of the most common noncancerous skin growths found in older adults. It most commonly appears as a brown, black or light tan growth on the face, chest, shoulders or back. Although they are not cancerous, they can look like skin cancer.

Seborrheic keratosis also known as seborrheic verruca or a senile wart.

Seborrheic keratosis is also known as seborrheic verruca or a senile wart.

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin. Although it is usually not life-threatening, it can be aggressive in some cases.

If left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Dermatologist examining male patient's skin for signs of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Your dermatologist will be able to examine your skin for signs of squamous cell carcinoma.

What Are Skin Cysts?

Cysts are pockets of tissue (sacs) that may become filled with pus, fluids, skin cells, and even air.

They are fairly common on the skin and can appear anywhere on the body. Cysts may feel like a pea under the surface of the skin, but without removal, they can grow significantly larger over time. In most cases, cysts are not painful, and they grow slowly. There are different types of cysts as we’ll discuss in the next section, and the vast majority of these skin growths are benign (not cancerous). Not all cysts will require treatment, but it is vitally important to have any lump under the skin evaluated and diagnosed by a board-certified dermatologist because some soft tissue malignancies (growths that are cancerous) can present like a cyst. Before recommending removal or other cyst treatments, your dermatologist will examine the growth to determine whether it is likely to cause you pain, become infected, or otherwise lead to skin health issues.

Dermatologist treating cyst on patient's back

Skin cysts, which can appear anywhere on the body, are usually painless and grow slowly.

What Is Lipoma?

A lipoma is a common, non-cancerous, soft tissue growth just below the skin made up of fat cells. Though most lipomas are not a cause for concern, if the growth becomes too large, it may become painful.

What Are Keloids?

Keloids are raised, red scars created by excessive healing of skin wounds, such as burns, cuts and acne. They are the result of an overproduction of collagen as the skin tries to repair itself. Keloids also can occur after piercings, tattoos or surgery and often times are itchy and painful. They can grow for years and sometimes show up three months or longer after the injury occurred.

Keloid scars on a patient's wrist.

Keloid are caused by an overproduction of collagen as the skin tries to repair itself.

Understanding Scar Development & How to Address These Skin Flaws

We all want healthy, beautiful skin. But scars, a natural part of the healing process, leave a lasting mark and cause some people to struggle with the negative impact on the appearance of their skin and in some cases, limitations in function or other concerns. If you’re unhappy with the appearance, texture, or health of your skin after an injury, surgery, or other damage that leads to scarring, the U.S. Dermatology Partners team can offer treatment to improve the appearance of scarring.

A scar on a woman's back.

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We Are Mohs Surgery Specialists

Mohs micrographic surgery is today’s preferred treatment for basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma skin cancers. By allowing for the complete removal of skin cancer while preserving the most amount of healthy skin, Mohs leads to minimal scarring. When completed successfully, Mohs can result in a 99% cure rate.

Watch How is Mohs Surgery is Performed

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