Nicholas R. Snavely, MD, FAAD


Board-Certified Dermatologist
Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon
Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology
Dr. Nicholas Snavely is a Board-Certified Dermatologist & Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon at U.S. Dermatology Partners in Belton, Georgetown & Waco, Texas.

Dr. Nicholas Snavely is a Board-Certified Dermatologist & Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon at U.S. Dermatology Partners in Belton, Georgetown & Waco, Texas.

 

Nicholas Snavely, MD is an expert in the prevention, detection and treatment of skin cancer, as well as advanced reconstruction.

Dr. Snavely is a cum laude graduate of Cornell University, graduating with a Bachelors in Biology. He earned his Doctorate of Medicine from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and went on to complete a dermatology residency at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, where he served as chief resident his final year. Following his residency, he completed an advanced dermatologic surgery fellowship at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, under accomplished surgeons Dr. Neil Swanson and Dr. Anna Bar.

Dr. Snavely grew up in Avon, Ohio, about 20 minutes west of Cleveland. He spent a good deal of his leisure time participating in sports – especially basketball. Dr. Snavely enjoys jogging, cooking, reading, and he still attempts to play basketball.

Dr. Nicholas Snavely treats patients in the following locations: U.S. Dermatology Georgetown, U.S. Dermatology Partners Belton TX, and U.S. Dermatology Partners Waco. You can read more about each location below.

Specialties and Affiliations
  • American Board of Dermatology
  • American Academy of Dermatology

Clinic Locations

Services Offered By Dr. Nicholas Snavely

What Is Actinic Keratosis?

Actinic Keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty lesion on the skin that develops slowly and indicates the presence of sun damage. It is most commonly found on parts of the body frequently exposed to the sun including the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands or forearms, neck, and shoulders.

Actinic Keratosis two days after a freezing removal treatment

Actinic keratosis improves just two days after a freezing removal treatment.

Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous and can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. In fact, some 40 to 60 percent of squamous cell skin cancers begin as untreated actinic keratoses.

Because of this, your doctor should be diligent in diagnosing, treating and monitoring actinic keratosis.

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Basal Cell Carcinoma, also known as basalioma or basal cell cancer, is the most common type of skin cancer and carries the least amount of risk, though it still requires attention. If caught and treated early, basal cell carcinomas are not likely to be life-threatening, but they do have the potential to cause disfigurement of the skin tissue.

Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S., and up to 30% of Caucasians may develop basal cell carcinomas in their lifetime.

Basal cell carcinoma treatment

Basal cell carcinoma can be treated by removing the affected area.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening. Though it is unlikely to spread to other parts of your body, if left untreated, basal cell carcinoma can move into nearby bone or other tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma typically begins as a small, shiny bump on the face, although it can occur on any part of the body.

What Is Cryotherapy?

Cryotherapy, or “cryosurgery,” is a simple, non-invasive procedure in which liquid nitrogen is used to freeze and destroy growths on the surface of the skin. This is an effective treatment for precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses), as well as other skin conditions such as warts, skin tags and moles.

Applying liquid nitrogen to skin lesions allows dermatologists to target the damaged skin cells and destroy them at the cellular level. After freezing, the affected area may blister and scab over, and should heal within three to six weeks.

Our dermatology team uses cryosurgery to treat a wide range of conditions. It offers a number of advantages: Cryotherapy is a simple, affordable outpatient procedure, the discomfort level is minimal, and there is a low risk of infection.

In cryotherapy treatment, liquid nitrogen is applied to the skin to freeze and destroy the affected tissue.

In cryotherapy treatment, liquid nitrogen is applied to the skin to freeze and destroy the affected tissue.

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What Is Mohs Surgery?

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

Mohs surgery is a highly specialized surgical technique used to treat non-melanoma skin cancers in which the surgeon removes all of the visible cancer, plus a small margin of the surrounding healthy tissue and examines it to ensure that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery.

Before and After Mohs Surgery Technique

The Mohs surgery technique treats skin cancers by removing all of the visible cancer. Image Source: newhealthadvisor.com

During Mohs micrographic surgery — named after Dr. Frederic Mohs, who first performed it in the 1930s — cancer is removed from the skin layer by layer until all cancerous cells have been removed. This type of surgery is most commonly used for cancers that have a high risk of re-occurrence. This technique allows for complete removal of the skin cancer while minimizing the removal of surrounding healthy skin.

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin. Although it is usually not life-threatening, it can be aggressive in some cases.

If left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Dermatologist examining male patient's skin for signs of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Your dermatologist will be able to examine your skin for signs of squamous cell carcinoma.

What is an Online Dermatologist?

Telemedicine, also known as online dermatology, telehealth, or teledermatology, is the use of telecommunications technology to provide care across a distance. This includes using the Internet, cell phones, SMS messaging and even satellites to allow physicians and patients to communicate medical information. This technology has been available for over a decade now, but as it has gotten better and better, telemedicine has now become much more available, easy to use, and secure. If used in the right way, it is one of the best ways that we can improve access to care.

Because dermatology is a very visual field and a specialty in high demand, patient access is often challenged by long wait times. Meeting a dermatologist online can be a great way to provide patients with increased access to skin care. Teledermatology involves the use of real-time video streaming, or more commonly the transmission of still images, pictures, and video in combination with a patient’s medical information collected via questionnaire. Teledermatology can be utilized in many ways including physician-to-physician consultations, triage, follow-up care, and patient education.

What Is Acanthosis Nigricans?

Acanthosis Nigricans is a condition that causes the skin to become discolored in the creases and folds of your body. This dark colored skin sometimes becomes thickened and often shows up in the armpits, groin and the folds of the neck.

Acanthosis Nicrigans causes generalized hyperpigmentation and velvety thickening of the skin. (source)

What Is an Annual Skin Examination?

Annual Skin Examinations are yearly scheduled skin exams with a dermatologist. Did you know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S.? In fact, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Sun damage to the skin is cumulative over a person’s lifetime, so the average risk of skin cancer also increases as our life expectancy gets longer.

Just as you schedule your annual physical or trip to the dentist, it is important to conduct a self-examination of your skin each month and schedule a professional annual skin examination once a year. Skin cancer is a treatable condition, but early detection is key.

 

What Is Dermatitis?

Dermatitis, also sometimes referred to as eczema, is a common condition characterized by an itchy rash and inflamed skin. There are many different types of dermatitis and symptoms can range in severity from mild itching and redness to severe blistering and cracked skin.

Girl with inflammation of skin on face.

Dermatitis is a group of diseases and comes in many forms, but all are characterized by inflammation of the skin, redness and itchiness.

What Is Eczema?

Eczema, also sometimes referred to as dermatitis, is a common condition characterized by a certain type of inflammation in the skin. There are many different types of eczema and symptoms can range from mild itching and redness to severe blistering and cracked skin. Whether you’re newly diagnosed with eczema or you’ve struggled with this chronic skin condition for years, you know that finding a treatment that works for you isn’t just important – it’s essential. Without proper and effective interventions, people with eczema can experience significant discomfort, itching, and inflammation.

At U.S. Dermatology Partners, our knowledgeable dermatologists partner with their patients to develop and maintain an effective eczema maintenance plan and provide advanced treatments for serious flareups. Learn more on this page or contact U.S. Dermatology Partners to get started working with us today.

What Is Hair Loss?

You might ask, what does hair loss have to do with skin?

Hair is actually a protein filament that grows from follicles deep in the skin up through the top layer of your skin. Your hair helps to regulate body temperature and also serves to protect your scalp. Almost everyone experiences some degree of hair loss at some point in life.

 

What Is Lipoma?

A lipoma is a common, non-cancerous, soft tissue growth just below the skin made up of fat cells. Though most lipomas are not a cause for concern, if the growth becomes too large, it may become painful.

What Are Moles?

Atypical moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, are unusual-looking benign (noncancerous) moles.

A dysplastic mole is one that, when viewed on a cellular level, has features unlike those of a healthy, benign mole. A benign mole will have a regular pattern of coloration and pigment, even borders, symmetry, and a tan or pink color. Dysplastic moles can be asymmetric, have indistinct borders, or contain multiple colors or very dark pigment.

Dysplastic moles are often spotted as the “ugly duckling” on a patient’s skin. Any departure from the typical mole a person’s skin makes may be dysplastic. They can appear anywhere on the body, but in most cases are found on the back, chest, buttocks, breasts, or scalp.

Benign mole on skin

People with atypical moles are at a higher risk of developing melanoma.

What Is a Nail Fungal Infection?

A fungal infection of the toenails or fingernails typically looks like white or yellowed nails that may also be thick and brittle. The infection could affect one nail or part of a nail, or it could affect multiple nails. If left untreated, fungal infections can lead to permanent nail damage.

Fungal infections of the nails lead to white or yellowing nails that can be thick or brittle.

Sunscreen 101

Individuals who are prone to sunburn are thought to be genetically predisposed to skin cancer. Risk is also increased when exposure to UV rays is excessive. Sunscreen helps prevent the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation, including skin aging and skin cancer like melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

Sunscreens are rated and labeled with a sun protection factor (SPF) that measures the fraction of sunburn-producing UV rays that reach the skin. The higher the SPF, the greater the protection.

Sunscreen is a topical product that is used to reflect or absorb some of the ultraviolet rays from the sun.

Sunscreen is a topical product that is used to reflect or absorb some of the ultraviolet rays from the sun.

Insurance Plans Accepted By Dr. Nicholas Snavely