Dario Kivelevitch, MD, FAAD


Board-Certified Dermatologist
Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology
Dr. Dario Kivelevitch is a dermatologist in Dallas, Texas at U.S. Dermatology Partners Dallas Presbyterian. Now accepting new patients!
LOCATION SERVICES REVIEWS
Accepting New Patients
Accepting New Patients

 

Dr. Dario Kivelevitch was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and completed his medical degree at the University of Buenos Aires. He graduated in 2000, completing a residency in both internal medicine and dermatology in Buenos Aires.

Following his training, he became Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Internal Medicine at the University of Buenos Aires. Dr. Kivelevitch has been involved in psoriasis research early in his dermatology career. In 2013, he accepted a two-year translational research fellowship at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research in Dallas, Texas. He retrained in dermatology through the Baylor Dermatology Residency Program and graduated as chief resident in June 2018.

Dr. Kivelevitch has published over 30 articles in peer-reviewed medical journals, such as Circulation and The Lancet. He has received several awards for his research and has presented his research findings to highly-esteemed audiences at numerous national and international medical conferences. The majority of his research has focused on the immunobiology of psoriasis and psoriasis therapy.

His areas of clinical interest include psoriasis, alopecia (hair loss), atopic dermatitis (eczema), contact dermatitis, acne, lupus, and skin cancer. His areas of interest in cosmetic dermatology include facial rejuvenation, neuromodulators, and injectable fillers. Dr. Kivelevitch treats patients at our Dallas Presbyterian office.

 

Additional Languages
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Clinic Locations

U.S. Dermatology Partners Dallas Presbyterian
U.S. Dermatology Partners Dallas Presbyterian

8210 Walnut Hill Ln
Bldg 1, #810
Dallas, TX 75231

(214) 373-3376

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Services Offered By Dario Kivelevitch, MD

What Is Actinic Keratosis?

Actinic Keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty lesion on the skin that develops slowly and indicates the presence of sun damage. It is most commonly found on parts of the body frequently exposed to the sun including the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands or forearms, neck, and shoulders.

Actinic Keratosis two days after a freezing removal treatment

Actinic keratosis improves just two days after a freezing removal treatment.

Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous and can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. In fact, some 40 to 60 percent of squamous cell skin cancers begin as untreated actinic keratoses.

Because of this, your doctor should be diligent in diagnosing, treating and monitoring actinic keratosis.

What Is an Annual Skin Examination?

Annual Skin Examinations are yearly scheduled skin exams with a dermatologist. Did you know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S.? In fact, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Sun damage to the skin is cumulative over a person’s lifetime, so the average risk of skin cancer also increases as our life expectancy gets longer.

Just as you schedule your annual physical or trip to the dentist, it is important to conduct a self-examination of your skin each month and schedule a professional annual skin examination once a year. Skin cancer is a treatable condition, but early detection is key.

 

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

Effective Acne Solutions

If you’ve struggled with moderate to severe acne, including cystic or nodular acne, you know that many common acne treatments aren’t effective for everyone. Fortunately, the physicians at U.S. Dermatology Partners commonly prescribe Accutane (isotretinoin) for the treatment of those patients with acne that is unresponsive to other therapeutic options.

If you’ve struggled with moderate to severe acne, including cystic or nodular acne, you know that many common acne treatments aren’t effective for everyone. Fortunately, the physicians at U.S. Dermatology Partners commonly prescribe Accutane (isotretinoin) for the treatment of those patients with acne that is unresponsive to other therapeutic options.

What Is Acne?

Acne is a dermatological condition caused by inflammation and mild infection in clogged pores. If not properly treated, acne can cause emotional distress, low self-esteem, and depression. In severe cases, it can even lead to permanent scarring.

While not a serious physical health threat, acne is an embarrassing skin problem that can be life-altering for many patients. Though it is most common among teenagers, acne can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender, and can be mild, moderate or severe.

Discover the Sources of Your Allergies

A dermatologist may recommend allergy patch testing to pinpoint the sources of allergic skin response. These tests can help you to avoid allergens and improve your skin and overall health. You can learn more about allergy patch testing at U.S. Dermatology Partners on this page or by contacting the location nearest you to schedule a consultation with one of our knowledgeable dermatologists.

Allergy Patch Testing is a treatment used to diagnose any form of contact dermatitis and determine which allergens affect the skin.

What Is Alopecia Areata?

Alopecia Areata, also known as spot baldness, is a type of hair loss in which your immune system attacks hair follicles. This leads to areas of baldness on the scalp and body. In severe cases, a person with alopecia may even lose the hair of their eyebrows and eyelashes.

 

What Is Eczema?

Eczema, also sometimes referred to as dermatitis, is a common condition characterized by a certain type of inflammation in the skin. There are many different types of eczema and symptoms can range from mild itching and redness to severe blistering and cracked skin. Whether you’re newly diagnosed with eczema or you’ve struggled with this chronic skin condition for years, you know that finding a treatment that works for you isn’t just important – it’s essential. Without proper and effective interventions, people with eczema can experience significant discomfort, itching, and inflammation.

At U.S. Dermatology Partners, our knowledgeable dermatologists partner with their patients to develop and maintain an effective eczema maintenance plan and provide advanced treatments for serious flareups. Learn more on this page or contact U.S. Dermatology Partners to get started working with us today.

What Is Hair Loss?

You might ask, what does hair loss have to do with skin?

Hair is actually a protein filament that grows from follicles deep in the skin up through the top layer of your skin. Your hair helps to regulate body temperature and also serves to protect your scalp. Almost everyone experiences some degree of hair loss at some point in life.

 

What Is Melasma?

Melasma is a fairly common skin condition that creates the appearance of brown to gray-brown patches of skin, usually on the face. It can also occur on the neck and forearms and is the result of the body producing too much melanin, that natural substance that colors our hair, skin, and eyes.

If you’re dealing with dark spots or patches on your skin from the chronic condition melasma, the U.S. Dermatology Partners team can help you to improve the appearance of these spots and minimize the risk for future flare-ups of the condition. Read the page below to learn more or reach out to the U.S. Dermatology Partners location nearest you for more information.

What Is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory condition that causes patches of skin to become red, inflamed, and bumpy. This disease affects more than 8 million people in the U.S.

Psoriasis occurs when the immune system mistakes skin cells for a virus or other infection and responds by producing more skin cell growth. This can be triggered by stress, anxiety, injuries to the skin, infections and hormonal changes.

What Is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a fairly common skin condition that causes redness in your face. In some cases, it may also produce small, red, pus-filled bumps. Typically these signs and symptoms may flare up for a period of weeks to months and then diminish for a while.

Rosacea may sometimes be mistaken for acne, an allergic reaction or other skin problems. It is believed to be caused by a combination of hereditary and environmental factors.

Learn more: 4 Types of Rosacea

Rosacea Treatment on facial skin.

Rosacea causes redness on the face.



What Is Vitiligo?

Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which white patches of skin appear on different areas of the body. This happens when melanocytes, the cells that make pigment in the skin, are destroyed. In addition to the skin, it can affect the mucous membranes of the mouth and nose as well as the eyes. Its cause is not known.

Young woman with vitiligo.

Vitiligo causes white patches on different areas of the body.

What Are Warts?

Warts are benign, non-cancerous growths that appear on the skin as the result of a virus called human papillomavirus, or HPV. They are contagious and are spread by contact – either with the wart or something that touched the wart. Cut or damaged skin is more vulnerable to warts.

Related: How to Identify a Wart

Dermatologist examining a wart on a patient's foot.

Warts are benign, non-cancerous growths that appear on the skin as the result of the human papillomavirus.

What Is Botox?

Botox, the commercial brand name for botulinum toxin (BTX), is an injectable cosmetic dermatology treatment that reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles on the face.

Unlike injectable wrinkle fillers, which work by filling a crease in your skin with another substance, Botox actually relaxes targeted muscles to reduce the look of lines in the face. This results in smoother skin with a more youthful appearance.

Each Botox injection relaxes key facial areas by temporarily paralyzing specific muscles. This temporarily removes wrinkles and improves the look of laugh and frown lines, skin bands on the neck, crow’s feet, forehead creases and more.

Close-up of woman receiving Botox treatment.

Botox is a quick procedure that is done in just minutes in your doctor’s office.

Although it was originally developed to treat eye muscle disorders, Botox has become popular cosmetically and this is now its primary use. In fact, Botox injections are now the most common cosmetic treatment in the U.S., with 6.3 million procedures done in 2013. Because Botox inhibits the release of certain neurotransmitters, it is also sometimes used to treat chronic migraines.

What Is Cosmetic Dermatology?

Looking to improve and recover your skin’s youthful appearance?

As we age, our skin naturally loses collagen and elasticity. At the same time, repetitive movements and expressions can create facial wrinkles. In addition to comprehensive medical procedures, dermatologists also provide a wide range of minimally-invasive, low impact treatments designed to address a number of aesthetic desires to help you look and feel your best.

While many conditions from unwanted hair and tattoos to wrinkles and rosacea may not be physically harmful, they can be uncomfortable and even cause emotional distress. Cosmetic dermatology offers a wide range of cosmetic surgery and non-surgical services focused on giving you the results you want without the pain, worry, and downtime.

Women's Face

Cosmetic dermatology focuses on aesthetic issues such as skin tone and overall appearance.

What Are Dermal Fillers?

Loss of facial fullness and volume is one of the many age-related changes that people want to address with their dermatologist. From store-bought topical treatments to advanced dermatologic and surgical procedures, there are numerous cosmetic dermatology treatments available to help restore youthful volume. However, dermal and soft tissue fillers are often the most conservative and impactful solutions to restore volume without undergoing more invasive treatments. There are many different types of dermal and soft tissue fillers, and each one is formulated to address a specific area or issue related to volume loss. You can learn more on this page.

At U.S. Dermatology Partners we offer premier dermatology services for patients of all ages. Book your appointment today to find the best facial filler treatment for you and your skin, using our simple, online scheduling request form.

Patient receiving dermal filler

The procedure for dermal fillers can usually be done in less than an hour.

What Our Patients Say

Dario Kivelevitch, MD
5 Stars  Professional and found a skin cancer that I had had for many years that others missed. –
Source : Healthgrades – Oct 02, 2022