Katharine Cordova, MD, FAAD


Board-Certified Dermatologist
Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon
Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology
Dr. Katharine Cordova is a Board-Certified Dermatologist and Fellowship-Trained Mohs Surgeon in Sun City West, Arizona offering high-quality skincare.

Sun City West, Arizona Dermatologist | Beatrice Keller Clinic | U.S. Dermatology Partners

 

Dr. Katharine Cordova completed her undergraduate training in nursing at the University of Arizona, where she graduated summa cum laude, honors. After working as an ICU nurse, she returned to the University of Arizona for Medical School where she graduated with academic honors, AOA. She completed her internship in Internal Medicine through Harvard Medical School at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

In 2009, Dr. Katharine Cordova finished her Dermatology residency at Brown University where she served as Chief resident. After two years of practicing medical and surgical dermatology in Rhode Island, she completed a Mohs micrographic surgery/procedural dermatology fellowship under the expert tutelage of Nathaniel Jellinek, MD. Her training included surgical and cosmetic dermatology with an emphasis on surgical technique, complex facial reconstruction, and nail surgery.

In 2011, Dr. Cordova joined Beatrice Keller Dermatology Clinic, now a part of U.S. Dermatology Partners, in Sun City West and continues to practice Mohs, facial reconstruction, nail surgery and cosmetics. Dr. Cordova is Board Certified by the American Board of Dermatology. She is a fellow of the America Academy of Dermatology and the American College of Mohs Surgery. Dr. Katharine Cordova is a Clinical Assistant Professor for the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix.

Clinic Locations

Beatrice Keller Clinic Sun City West
Beatrice Keller Clinic Sun City West

14506 West Granite Valley Drive
Suites 205 & 206
Sun City West, AZ 85375

(623) 584-2127

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Services Offered By Dr. Katharine Cordova

What Is Actinic Keratosis?

Actinic Keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty lesion on the skin that develops slowly and indicates the presence of sun damage. It is most commonly found on parts of the body frequently exposed to the sun including the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands or forearms, neck, and shoulders.

Actinic Keratosis two days after a freezing removal treatment

Actinic keratosis improves just two days after a freezing removal treatment.

Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous and can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. In fact, some 40 to 60 percent of squamous cell skin cancers begin as untreated actinic keratoses.

Because of this, your doctor should be diligent in diagnosing, treating and monitoring actinic keratosis.

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Basal Cell Carcinoma, also known as basalioma or basal cell cancer, is the most common type of skin cancer and carries the least amount of risk, though it still requires attention. If caught and treated early, basal cell carcinomas are not likely to be life-threatening, but they do have the potential to cause disfigurement of the skin tissue.

Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S., and up to 30% of Caucasians may develop basal cell carcinomas in their lifetime.

Basal cell carcinoma treatment

Basal cell carcinoma can be treated by removing the affected area.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening. Though it is unlikely to spread to other parts of your body, if left untreated, basal cell carcinoma can move into nearby bone or other tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma typically begins as a small, shiny bump on the face, although it can occur on any part of the body.

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What Is Mohs Surgery?

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

Mohs surgery is a highly specialized surgical technique used to treat non-melanoma skin cancers in which the surgeon removes all of the visible cancer, plus a small margin of the surrounding healthy tissue and examines it to ensure that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery.

Before and After Mohs Surgery Technique

The Mohs surgery technique treats skin cancers by removing all of the visible cancer. Image Source: newhealthadvisor.com

During Mohs micrographic surgery — named after Dr. Frederic Mohs, who first performed it in the 1930s — cancer is removed from the skin layer by layer until all cancerous cells have been removed. This type of surgery is most commonly used for cancers that have a high risk of re-occurrence. This technique allows for complete removal of the skin cancer while minimizing the removal of surrounding healthy skin.

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin. Although it is usually not life-threatening, it can be aggressive in some cases.

If left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Dermatologist examining male patient's skin for signs of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Your dermatologist will be able to examine your skin for signs of squamous cell carcinoma.

What is an Online Dermatologist?

Telemedicine, also known as online dermatology, telehealth, or teledermatology, is the use of telecommunications technology to provide care across a distance. This includes using the Internet, cell phones, SMS messaging and even satellites to allow physicians and patients to communicate medical information. This technology has been available for over a decade now, but as it has gotten better and better, telemedicine has now become much more available, easy to use, and secure. If used in the right way, it is one of the best ways that we can improve access to care.

Because dermatology is a very visual field and a specialty in high demand, patient access is often challenged by long wait times. Meeting a dermatologist online can be a great way to provide patients with increased access to skin care. Teledermatology involves the use of real-time video streaming, or more commonly the transmission of still images, pictures, and video in combination with a patient’s medical information collected via questionnaire. Teledermatology can be utilized in many ways including physician-to-physician consultations, triage, follow-up care, and patient education.

What Is Laser Rosacea Therapy?

Laser rosacea therapy is a way to treat a rosacea complexion. One of the most common and effective treatments is the pulsed dye laser (PDL), which targets visible blood vessels and can reduce redness and flushing by destroying the lining of the inflamed blood vessels.

Rosacea on facial skin, treatable with laser rosacea therapy

Rosacea on facial skin is treatable with laser rosacea therapy.

What Is Lipoma?

A lipoma is a common, non-cancerous, soft tissue growth just below the skin made up of fat cells. Though most lipomas are not a cause for concern, if the growth becomes too large, it may become painful.

What Is Cosmetic Dermatology?

Looking to improve and recover your skin’s youthful appearance?

As we age, our skin naturally loses collagen and elasticity. At the same time, repetitive movements and expressions can create facial wrinkles. In addition to comprehensive medical procedures, dermatologists also provide a wide range of minimally-invasive, low impact treatments designed to address a number of aesthetic desires to help you look and feel your best.

While many conditions from unwanted hair and tattoos to wrinkles and rosacea may not be physically harmful, they can be uncomfortable and even cause emotional distress. Cosmetic dermatology offers a wide range of cosmetic surgery and non-surgical services focused on giving you the results you want without the pain, worry, and downtime.

Women's Face

Cosmetic dermatology focuses on aesthetic issues such as skin tone and overall appearance.

What Are Laser Treatments?

Laser treatments work by using specific wavelengths of light to interact with tissue, which can positively affect pigment, blood vessels, hair follicles and moisture in the skin. The result is improved skin tone and texture, as well as the tightening of loose skin.

Lasers can also be tuned to very specific frequencies to perform different tasks and can even be used in surgery to allow doctors to work on a very precise area with less pain, swelling and scarring than traditional surgery.

Cosmetically, lasers can be used for skin resurfacing and to treat such things as acne, wrinkles, rosacea and more.

 

Insurance Plans Accepted By Dr. Katharine Cordova

What Our Patients Say

Katharine Cordova, MD
4 Stars  Timely, efficient, knowledgeable all employees were kind and caring, my experience was wonderful –
Source : Healthgrades – Jan 22, 2021
Katharine Cordova, MD
5 Stars  Dr. Cordova and her staff are very professional and caring. They explain everything in detail and make you feel very comfortable. I recommend her without reservation. –
Source : Healthgrades – Jan 13, 2021
Katharine Cordova, MD
5 Stars  Cheerful, professional, and very competent! –
Source : Healthgrades – Jan 11, 2021