Mohs Surgeon in Pasadena

U.S. Dermatology Partners Pasadena

Office of U.S. Dermatology Partners Pasadena - Pasadena Dermatologists
5125 Preston Rd
#150
Pasadena, TX 77505

We are located in the John Manlove Communications Building.

Get Directions

(281) 991-0737

Fax: (281) 991-0738

Monday:

7:15AM - 3:00PM

Tuesday:

7:15AM - 3:00PM

Wednesday:

7:15AM - 3:00PM

Thursday:

7:15AM - 3:00PM

Friday:

Closed

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

About Our Mohs Surgery Office in Pasadena

We offer the most experience as a Pasadena dermatology for the treatment of skin cancer with Mohs surgery, the most effective treatment for high risk or recurrent skin cancers. We welcome you as a patient and sincerely appreciate the opportunity to treat you in a safe and comfortable environment.

Our goal is to:

  • Inform and educate our patients about their skin condition and treatment options.
  • Provide state-of-the-art medical and surgical care.
  • Make each patient feel comfortable during their stay with us.

Dr. Aaron Joseph is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology and is a fellow of the American College of Mohs Surgery.

Why Choose a Fellowship Trained Mohs Surgeon?

When it comes to your skin cancer treatment, you deserve no less than the best. Dr. Joseph has achieved the highest degree of Mohs surgery qualification by completing an American College of Mohs Surgery-approved fellowship. For you, this means peace of mind, knowing that you will receive superior quality and competency, as well as an optimal outcome.

Our laboratory is CLIA certified, and our office is accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc.

Why AAAHC Accreditation Matters

The AAAHC accredits surgical facilities that are committed to providing high-quality health care and meeting high patient safety standards. Many offices do not have accreditation because of the time commitment and need for an ongoing quality improvement program. However, at U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston – Pasadena, we feel that patient safety is paramount and strive to make our facility the finest in the area.

As part of our accreditation, our office participates in on-going self-evaluation, peer review and education to continuously improve care and service. We are committed to an on-site, thorough survey by AAAHC surveyors, who are trained physicians and nurses, at least every three years.

We have just received our recertification through 2019, the highest level (3 years), after our two-day onsite survey and review of all office procedures, policies and safety protocols. We are the only freestanding office-based surgery center in the area accredited by AAAHC. We first achieved accreditation in 2004 and have been re-certified every three years.

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

U.S. Dermatology Partners of Houston - Pasadena office

Dermatology Services

What Is Actinic Keratosis?

Actinic Keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty lesion on the skin that develops slowly and indicates the presence of sun damage. It is most commonly found on parts of the body frequently exposed to the sun including the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands or forearms, neck, and shoulders.

Actinic Keratosis two days after a freezing removal treatment

Actinic keratosis improves just two days after a freezing removal treatment.

Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous and can develop into a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. In fact, some 40 to 60 percent of squamous cell skin cancers begin as untreated actinic keratoses.

Because of this, your doctor should be diligent in diagnosing, treating and monitoring actinic keratosis.

What Is Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Basal Cell Carcinoma, also known as basalioma or basal cell cancer, is the most common type of skin cancer and carries the least amount of risk, though it still requires attention. If caught and treated early, basal cell carcinomas are not likely to be life-threatening, but they do have the potential to cause disfigurement of the skin tissue.

Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S., and up to 30% of Caucasians may develop basal cell carcinomas in their lifetime.

Basal cell carcinoma treatment

Basal cell carcinoma can be treated by removing the affected area.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening. Though it is unlikely to spread to other parts of your body, if left untreated, basal cell carcinoma can move into nearby bone or other tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma typically begins as a small, shiny bump on the face, although it can occur on any part of the body.

What Is Melanoma?

Melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, only accounts for about 4 percent of all skin cancer cases, but causes about 79 percent of skin cancer deaths.

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that produce the pigment melanin. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women 25 to 30 years old and the second leading cause of cancer death in women 30 to 35 years old.

In some cases, melanoma occurs in melanocytes throughout the body, even if those parts have never been exposed to the sun.

 

What Is Mohs Surgery?

Mohs surgery offers the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

Mohs surgery is a highly specialized surgical technique used to treat non-melanoma skin cancers in which the surgeon removes all of the visible cancer, plus a small margin of the surrounding healthy tissue and examines it to ensure that all cancer cells have been removed at the time of surgery.

Before and After Mohs Surgery Technique

The Mohs surgery technique treats skin cancers by removing all of the visible cancer. Image Source: newhealthadvisor.com

During Mohs micrographic surgery — named after Dr. Frederic Mohs, who first performed it in the 1930s — cancer is removed from the skin layer by layer until all cancerous cells have been removed. This type of surgery is most commonly used for cancers that have a high risk of re-occurrence. This technique allows for complete removal of the skin cancer while minimizing the removal of surrounding healthy skin.

What Is Seborrheic Keratosis?

Seborrheic keratosis is one of the most common noncancerous skin growths found in older adults. It most commonly appears as a brown, black or light tan growth on the face, chest, shoulders or back. Although they are not cancerous, they can look like skin cancer.

Seborrheic keratosis also known as seborrheic verruca or a senile wart.

Seborrheic keratosis is also known as seborrheic verruca or a senile wart.

 

What Is Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. with more than 3.5 million cases diagnosed each year.

Skin cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells that takes place when skin cells suffer DNA damage and then mutate, causing them to multiply rapidly and form malignant (cancerous) tumors. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly on sun-exposed areas such as the face, head, hands, arms and legs. They are usually easy to detect with a skin examination, which increases the chances of early diagnosis.

There are different types of skin cancer, each named for the type of skin cell from which they originate. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma. Almost one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed each year in the U.S. Most skin cancers fall into one of three categories:

There are often warning signs that cancer is developing. The most common are pre-cancerous lesions called actinic keratoses that often develop on sun-exposed areas. These tumors replace normal surrounding tissue and generally do not spread to other areas.

Skin cancer is considered low risk when the affected cells remain clustered in a single group. Both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are rarely life-threatening.

Skin cancer is considered a high risk when cells have invaded surrounding tissues. The third most common skin cancer, malignant melanoma, can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated early.

If skin cancer is detected before it has spread to surrounding tissues, the chances of a complete recovery and cure are excellent. High-risk forms of cancer like melanoma require more aggressive treatments.

Doctor removing mole from a patient's shoulder.

Suspicious moles should be watched closely, as they might indicate a cancerous growth.

What Is Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the outer layer of the skin. Although it is usually not life-threatening, it can be aggressive in some cases.

If left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can grow large or spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Dermatologist examining male patient's skin for signs of Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Your dermatologist will be able to examine your skin for signs of squamous cell carcinoma.

What Are Skin Cysts?

Cysts are pockets of tissue (sacs) that may become filled with pus, fluids, skin cells, and even air.

They are fairly common on the skin and can appear anywhere on the body. Cysts may feel like a pea under the surface of the skin, but without removal, they can grow significantly larger over time. In most cases, cysts are not painful, and they grow slowly. There are different types of cysts as we’ll discuss in the next section, and the vast majority of these skin growths are benign (not cancerous). Not all cysts will require treatment, but it is vitally important to have any lump under the skin evaluated and diagnosed by a board-certified dermatologist because some soft tissue malignancies (growths that are cancerous) can present like a cyst. Before recommending removal or other cyst treatments, your dermatologist will examine the growth to determine whether it is likely to cause you pain, become infected, or otherwise lead to skin health issues.

Dermatologist treating cyst on patient's back

Skin cysts, which can appear anywhere on the body, are usually painless and grow slowly.

What Is Dermatitis?

Dermatitis, also sometimes referred to as eczema, is a common condition characterized by an itchy rash and inflamed skin. There are many different types of dermatitis and symptoms can range in severity from mild itching and redness to severe blistering and cracked skin.

Girl with inflammation of skin on face.

Dermatitis is a group of diseases and comes in many forms, but all are characterized by inflammation of the skin, redness and itchiness.

What Is Lipoma?

A lipoma is a common, non-cancerous, soft tissue growth just below the skin made up of fat cells. Though most lipomas are not a cause for concern, if the growth becomes too large, it may become painful.

What Are Moles?

Atypical moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, are unusual-looking benign (noncancerous) moles.

A dysplastic mole is one that, when viewed on a cellular level, has features unlike those of a healthy, benign mole. A benign mole will have a regular pattern of coloration and pigment, even borders, symmetry, and a tan or pink color. Dysplastic moles can be asymmetric, have indistinct borders, or contain multiple colors or very dark pigment.

Dysplastic moles are often spotted as the “ugly duckling” on a patient’s skin. Any departure from the typical mole a person’s skin makes may be dysplastic. They can appear anywhere on the body, but in most cases are found on the back, chest, buttocks, breasts, or scalp.

Benign mole on skin

People with atypical moles are at a higher risk of developing melanoma.

Safe and Effective Skin Cancer Treatment

Photodynamic Therapy, often referred to simply as PDT, is a medical treatment that uses photosensitizing agents and light exposure to treat a range of conditions, including skin cancers, acne, and actinic keratosis (“pre-cancers”). You can learn more about photodynamic therapy on this page, and the U.S. Dermatology Partners team would love to hear from you if you’re interested in scheduling a consultation to discuss photodynamic therapy.  Simply use our online request form to schedule a consultation visit at the U.S. Dermatology Partners office closest to you.

Photodynamic Therapy PDT

Image Source: MedicineNet.com

What Is Sebaceous Hyperplasia?

Sebaceous hyperplasia is a benign bump on the skin that forms as a result of over-productive oil glands. When oil glands are damaged, they can become enlarged and clogged, leading to this condition. It is primarily a cosmetic concern rather than a medical problem.

Sebaceous hyperplasia is a benign bump on the skin that forms as a result of over-productive oil glands

Sebaceous hyperplasia is a benign bump on the skin that forms as a result of over-productive oil glands.

What Are Skin Tags?

Skin tags are small, soft skin growths that can occur anywhere on the body but are most common on the eyelids, neck, armpits, groin folds and under the breasts. They are harmless but they can be annoying, particularly if they are in an area where they are rubbed on by clothing. They may be flesh-colored, pink or may darken.

Dermatologist examines a skin tags of patient, close up.

Skin tags are small, soft growths that can be skin-colored, pink, or may darken.

Sunscreen 101

Individuals who are prone to sunburn are thought to be genetically predisposed to skin cancer. Risk is also increased when exposure to UV rays is excessive. Sunscreen helps prevent the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation, including skin aging and skin cancer like melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

Sunscreens are rated and labeled with a sun protection factor (SPF) that measures the fraction of sunburn-producing UV rays that reach the skin. The higher the SPF, the greater the protection.

Sunscreen is a topical product that is used to reflect or absorb some of the ultraviolet rays from the sun.

Sunscreen is a topical product that is used to reflect or absorb some of the ultraviolet rays from the sun.

What Are Keloids?

Keloids are raised, red scars created by excessive healing of skin wounds, such as burns, cuts and acne. They are the result of an overproduction of collagen as the skin tries to repair itself. Keloids also can occur after piercings, tattoos or surgery and often times are itchy and painful. They can grow for years and sometimes show up three months or longer after the injury occurred.

Keloid scars on a patient's wrist.

Keloid are caused by an overproduction of collagen as the skin tries to repair itself.

Understanding Scar Development & How to Address These Skin Flaws

We all want healthy, beautiful skin. But scars, a natural part of the healing process, leave a lasting mark and cause some people to struggle with the negative impact on the appearance of their skin and in some cases, limitations in function or other concerns. If you’re unhappy with the appearance, texture, or health of your skin after an injury, surgery, or other damage that leads to scarring, the U.S. Dermatology Partners team can offer treatment to improve the appearance of scarring.

A scar on a woman's back.

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Get to Know Us Better

Did you know that we offer Mohs Surgery at our location?

Mohs surgery has the highest cure rates for all non-melanoma skin cancers. For certain cases of the most common types of skin cancer — squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma — the cure rate can be as high as 99 percent.

How is Mohs Surgery Performed? Watch Here.

(Click Here to Watch Spanish Version)

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